• 16 Feb 2016

    Will league tables drive meaningful change on gender pay?

    By Dianah Worman OBE, Policy Adviser, CIPD The gender pay gap has remained stubbornly fixed at around 19% for four years, following a substantial shift from 27.5% to 22% from 1997, when it was first used, to 2009. The Prime Minister, David Came...
    • 7 Dec 2015

    CIPD report on zero-hours and short-hours contracts reveals the polarity of the debate

    It is no surprise to see the CIPD's new report on zero-hours and short-hours contracts come under attack this morning from the TUC and other commentators.‎ Some commentators appear to start from the position that there simply is little or not...
    • 14 Sep 2015

    Legislation to tackle yesterday’s problems?

    By Mike Emmott, Employee Relations Adviser, CIPD, @emmott_m Why has the Government chosen to legislate now to amend the law on industrial action? The number of days lost to strike action has dropped by over 90% in the last twenty years and employers say that relationships with trade unions are generally good. Yet the Government has introduced legislation requiring strike ballots to achieve new turnout and support thresholds...
    • 26 Aug 2015

    CIPD report on graduate over-qualification sparks overdue debate that is set to run and run

    By Ben Willmott, CIPD Head of Public Policy, @Ben_Willmott I was slightly taken aback by the dismissive response from some representatives of the UK’s higher education sector to our report, Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market , which highlighted the scale of the country’s graduate-over qualification problem. On Thursday, Bill Rammell, former Minister for Higher Education...
    • 18 Aug 2015

    Hurdles facing non-EEA workers continue to mount

    By Gerwyn Davies , Labour Market Adviser at the CIPD, @Davies_Gerwyn Against the backdrop of a tight labour market, it seems that one of the solutions available to employers may be about to get harder. Following the introduction of a series of restrictions on non-EEA workers over recent years, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) has been charged with analysing the potential for reducing the inflow of non-EEA workers...
    • 10 Aug 2015

    The impact of “Brexit” on employment law

    By Mike Emmott, CIPD Employment Relations Adviser, @emmott_m What would happen to employment law if the UK were to leave the EU? Would the legislation introduced in response to EU directives, including TUPE, working time and agency working, simply fall away overnight? Nothing seems more improbable. The likelihood is there would be very little immediate change, but rather some limited changes over time. David...
    • 28 Jul 2015

    Disability Confident: can we turn a corner?

    By Beth Lazzarato, CIPD Public Affairs Assistant, @BethLazzarato This week the Department for Work and Pensions will be celebrating the two year anniversary of the launch of Disability Confident , its campaign which aims to improve employer attitudes towards hiring disabled people. Marking this anniversary will provide a great opportunity to applaud many promising signs of progress, the most significant of which is...
    • 27 Jul 2015

    When paying men and women, can you prove you are being fair?

    By Dianah Worman , Diversity Adviser, CIPD Forty five years after the introduction of the Equal Pay Act , the Government launched a consultation document ‘ Closing the gender pay gap’ to explore views about how to develop regulations to implement the legal obligation incorporated in the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 by the previous Coalition Government. This law will make it compulsory...
    • 15 Jul 2015

    Will new strike laws be effective?

    by Mike Emmott, CIPD Employment Relations Adviser, @emmott_m It shouldn’t perhaps be any surprise that the first Conservative Government in almost twenty years is keen to revisit the law on industrial action. The number of days lost through strikes is running at historically low levels, but over 90 per cent of those lost days are in the public sector. And industrial action in the public sector is generally not...
    • 7 Jul 2015

    Building more productive workplaces

    By Ben Willmott, Head of Public Policy, CIPD, @Ben_Willmott In the run up this week’s Budget, we know that one of the big problems preoccupying the Chancellor, George Osborne, is how to boost the UK’s stagnant productivity. He has promised to take action to address this – something the CIPD has been calling for over the last 18 months. The UK has seen seven years of productivity standstill...
    • 19 Jun 2015

    Father’s Day, Fathers’ Year!

    Mike Emmott, Public Policy Adviser, Employee Relations Most fathers will be looking forward to their special day this weekend, as children across the UK celebrate their dads. But prospective fathers might be celebrating too this year, as they’ve received a significant benefit in the form of a statutory right to shared parental leave (SPL). Since 5 April 2015, most working fathers whose partners are also in work...
    • 11 Jun 2015

    Are you Disability Confident?

    By Beth Lazzarato, Public Affairs Assistant, CIPD, @BethLazzarato Yesterday was only my fourth day of working for the CIPD. However, it was also a day in which I had the exciting opportunity to attend a CIPD Network event with representatives from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), public and private sector employers, and a number of disability charities. So what was the aim of the event? For attendees...
    • 1 Jun 2015

    What does the outcome of the general election mean for business and HR?

    By Mark Beatson, CIPD Chief Economist, @MarkBeatson1 Last month month, I had the pleasure of joining the Northamptonshire branch for their Annual General Meeting, where I offered some thoughts on what the outcome of the General Election might mean for business and HR. The outcome might have come as a surprise if you had been following the media or the polls but less so, apparently, if you had been following the...
    • 6 May 2015

    Executive pay: giving workers a say

    By Mike Emmott, Employee Relations Adviser, CIPD, @emmott_m It shouldn’t be too long before we know the outcome of the election. Whatever its impact in other areas, it’s likely to have a significant influence on the direction of employment law. The Labour election Manifesto says the Party will “make sure employees have a voice when executive pay is set by requiring employee representation...
    • 5 May 2015

    Productivity – your doorstep checklist

    By Mark Beatson, Chief Economist, CIPD, @MarkBeatson1 At the start of the year we said that 2015 needed to see a 'productivity rollover' . Well, the Budget didn't even mention productivity so what about the election campaign? Surely, the parties would be highlighting how a vote for them would boost the UK’s productivity and hence lead to higher wage growth? Especially given that future productivity...
    • 28 Apr 2015

    Government’s end of term report on employment and welfare reform: “Good, but could do better”

    By Gerwyn Davies, CIPD Labour Market Adviser, @Davies_Gerwyn If one were to award a grade for each subject, the coalition government would rightly expect a high grade for its record on employment and welfare reform. An increase of more than 1.8 million people in employment, coupled with a fall in the unemployment rate from 7.9% to 5.6% since May 2010, is an impressive record by anybody’s standards. However, it...
    • 21 Apr 2015

    Improving corporate governance – it’s the people, stupid!

    By Ben Willmott, Head of CIPD Public Policy, @Ben_Willmott One issue that has not been at the forefront of political agenda in the run up to the General Election has been corporate governance, which is perhaps not surprising given the attention taken up by the big debates about the economy and the NHS. Even in the detail of the party manifestos, little attention has been paid to this issue. Of the parties...
    • 15 Apr 2015

    The future of apprenticeships – are the political parties ‘learning on the job’?

    Annie Peate, Policy and Campaigns Officer, CIPD, @AnniePeate Over the last few years, apprenticeships have undergone a change of image. No longer seen as the poor relation of the university degree, apprenticeships are an increasingly attractive way to gain a qualification and job-specific skills whilst earning a wage. They’re equally attractive for employers, for whom apprenticeships provide the means of...
    • 7 Apr 2015

    Employee relations - let us move away from this short termism

    By Mike Emmott, Employee Relations Adviser, CIPD, @emmott_m The party manifestos on employment issues are disappointingly thin – the big gap is on productivity. It’s no use lamenting low pay or declining living standards unless you have some ideas about how to boost productivity, otherwise it’s a zero-sum game. CIPD is clear that successive governments have failed to give workplace issues the...
    • 30 Mar 2015

    The 21st Century business imperative

    By Dianah Worman OBE, CIPD Diversity Adviser High noise levels about the improved numbers of women on boards provides a timely opportunity to press home the message that progressing diversity and inclusion isn’t just about making things easier for ambitious women to get a fair share of the numbers of top jobs in business. The progress we have made in the UK since Lord Davies set his agenda for private companies...
    • 24 Mar 2015

    Shifting the dial on the UK’s pay problems

    Over the last year, there’s been barely a day when the issue of pay hasn’t been out of the headlines. With employment levels consistently rising, the current challenge for both Government and for businesses is to address why pay packets have struggled to follow the same trajectory. However, we’re starting to see the dial on this shift, starting with last week’s announcement by the Government...
    • 18 Mar 2015

    Will the Budget be productive?

    By Mark Beatson, Chief Economist, CIPD, @MarkBeatson1 The UK has a productivity problem. We don't produce as much per hour as competitors like the USA, France and Germany , which has been the case for decades, and since 2008 it has got worse. We produce 2% less per hour worked than we did at the beginning of 2008. So how will we judge the productivity of today’s Budget speech? There are two things the...
    • 23 Feb 2015

    Whistleblowing and the Francis report

    By Mike Emmott, CIPD Employee Relations Adviser, @emmott_m It is unlikely that Robert Francis QC knew what he was letting himself in for when he agreed in 2009 to conduct an enquiry into what had gone wrong at the Mid-Staffordshire NHS Trust. After reporting in 2010 on what went wrong, and a subsequent enquiry into why it happened which reported in 2013, we now have his report, Freedom to Speak Up (February 2015...
    • 10 Feb 2015

    Cameron's call for bosses to give staff a pay rise ignores the need for a government focus to increase UK productivity levels – CIPD

    Ben Willmott, Head of Public Policy at the CIPD, the professional body for HR and people development: “Yes, costs are falling and it’s cheaper to do business but productivity growth is still stalling. Simply asking businesses to improve pay without examining more closely the factors which have contributed to our poor productivity performance fails to address the underlying cause of low wage growth. “The...
    • 19 Jan 2015

    Soft Skills and their value to the UK economy

    By Annie Peate, Policy and Campaigns Officer, CIPD, @AnniePeate The importance of soft skills is an issue that comes up time and time again whenever we speak to employers about the skills they value most in their workforce. Anecdotally we know that level of soft skills impacts productivity of an organisation, as well as the ability to innovate and remain competitive. This week anecdote became fact, as new research...