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What the EU Referendum result means for HR...

Steve Bridger

| 7272 Posts

Community Manager

24 Jun, 2016 09:06

In the light of vote to leave EU, we’ll be contacting CIPD members to advise them what the result means for HR and the world of work.

More to come during the day, which I will post here.

UPDATE: Download Vote Leave Q & A...

Vote Leave Q & A (4).pdf

  • Keith

    | 10416 Posts

    Chartered Fellow

    24 Jun, 2016 09:14

    2-4 years of uncertainty

    Lots of concerned employees especially those from EU countries, but things settling down over coming months. Deal done to allow people here to stay.

    Probably an influx of people during "window" of being still in

    Scottish independence referendum leading to two sets of laws

    Lots of noise about reducing red tape but most HR regulations (WTR etc) remain in place

    General economic slump / bump

    But the world will go on

  • Good morning all

    I am wondering given both the conversations I have overheard this morning and in particular posts I have seen on social media people are planning to manage the inevitable conflict between staff related to such an emotive and divisive subject. 

    Many of the people who have voted to Remain that work for our business have not been shy about levelling some quite inflammatory statements about the Leave camp being driven by deep rooted racism and small-minded, ignorant bigotry. Many statements like this I think leave-voters will find quite objectionable, and  I have already witnessed many insults being exchanged between members of staff on social media. 

    We have a management meeting this morning and I am minded to ask that the management team in particular remembers that one of their key roles is to build teams which are cohesive and respectful of one another (much in the spirit of 'better together'!). Is this however the responsibility of the employer? I think managers in particular should be quite careful about what views they expressed and how they do so, bearing in mind the effect this has on those employees who have chosen to vote leave. 

    I can see one situation in particular escalating to grievance stages already so wondered if there was a particular approach anyone would recommend to make sure management time is not sucked up by dealing with petty squabbles, when many of them will already be concerned about how this affects what is expected of them in the immediate and medium term future (I work in property and our share prices have dropped this morning by 20% - we will all be feeling the pressure). 

    As I type I've had a further situation brought to my attention. 

    Appreciate it's very raw but just interested to seek views on what others think! 

  • Keith

    | 10416 Posts

    Chartered Fellow

    24 Jun, 2016 10:14

    In reply to Caroline:

    I would be very careful of drawing to much attention to this. By all means have a low level discussion with your managers about what is appropriate in the work place.

    But my sense is that the "heat" is a 24 hour wonder and will blow over in the coming days as the reality settles that a decision has been made
  • In reply to Keith:

    Our chief cheese has opted to send round a nice email saying we're all for healthy debate but more so for respecting others' opinions so to kindly bear that in mind when discussing the result. Seems to have had the desired effect.

    I know it'll all calm down (although perhaps not in time for it to be this evening's fish and chip paper) - nice to see people engaging in politics for a change anyway! :)
  • Ray Naylor

    | 2461 Posts

    Chartered Member

    24 Jun, 2016 11:03

    In employment terms, one key element that has hardly been covered concerns social securtiy reciprocal agreements. A person contributing to the social security system in one EU can benefit from coverage in other countries in the case of international mobility. For example, under this reciprocal system my 10 years of paying into the UK social security system gives me a certain amount of credit for a french state pension. Similarly, access to the medical system of EU coutries is available for people who contribute to the social security system of another country - reducing (but not removing) the need for medical insurance when traveling in Europe.
    Stepping outside of the EU will require the negotiation and implementation of bilateral social security treaties with each EU state - or (more likely) a grouped one such as the treaty between Switzerland and all EU states.
  • Mike Morrison

    | 4175 Posts

    Chartered Fellow

    24 Jun, 2016 12:23

    In reply to Ray Naylor:

    Ray
    "A person contributing to the social security system in one EU can benefit from coverage in other countries in the case of international mobility"
    In theory yes - but not always. I was working in the EU for 2 years, but HMRC wont credit anything!
  • Mike Morrison

    | 4175 Posts

    Chartered Fellow

    24 Jun, 2016 12:24

    Just a reminder to posters, that this is a public page and anyone can see the responses
  • Ray Naylor

    | 2461 Posts

    Chartered Member

    24 Jun, 2016 13:31

    In reply to Mike Morrison:

    Mike
    The procedure may be complicated - but,provided you meet the eligibililty criteria and have obtained all the appropriate employer/employee contribution certification from the authorities in the state in question, there is no reason why you should not be able to get your years of social security contributions counting towards the basic state pension. In your case, two years of contributions will probaly make next to no difference to the level of basic state pension. If you were working as an independent consultant/contractor, then that can be problematic for some countries where the social security regime is not necessarily a normal "state" régime.
    What was your specific situation?
  • Mike Morrison

    | 4175 Posts

    Chartered Fellow

    24 Jun, 2016 15:41

    In reply to Ray Naylor:

    local PAYE and HMRC refuses to talk to the Danish tax office about it. It is only 2 years, but a personal example of how this is not working
  • Hi everyone, new blog post to add to the resources here from our People and Strategy Director, Laura Harrison

  • Ray Naylor

    | 2461 Posts

    Chartered Member

    24 Jun, 2016 16:10

    In reply to Mike Morrison:

    Mike - the normal route would be for you to obtain formal certification from Denmark concerning your contributions into the Danish system. You'll not get a lot of joy from local HMRC teams (it's too specialised for them - not their fault) and would get better mileage by contacting the "International Caseworker" team at Longbenton, Newcastle. Hope this helps
    Ray
  • Paul

    | 98 Posts

    Associate

    24 Jun, 2016 23:43

    What will happen to CIPD qualifications and courses where students want to have EU employment law covered? How will CIPD qualifications and courses (with employment law elements) retain their currency, standing and relevance at a European level?
  • In reply to Caroline:

    I have been also shocked by the insults flying around. I will watch this post with interest.
  • I came across this and found it quite interesting at this early stage in what, in my opinion, will be a long drawn out confusing process that we don't know how it will end:

    https://www.macroberts.com/how-will-your-business-be-affected/?utm_source=Master+List&utm_campaign=a2cd6b1463-Brexit_Blog_24_06_16&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7a8e547253-a2cd6b1463-138765193

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